Tuesday, June 23, 2009

100% Recycled, Wildflower Embeded Paper

Now, here is a great idea!

Plantable Paper


Plantable paper is 100% post-consumer waste paper embedded with wildflower seeds. After the announcement is read, invitation noted, thanks accepted or birthday celebrated, you plant the paper and, voilĂ , wildflowers grow.
  • Bird's Eye
  • Clarkia
  • Black Eyed Susan
  • Poppy
  • Catchfly
  • Snap Dragon
They have a full selection of business and greeting cards, invitation and thank you cards, stationery with matching envelopes.

Do it Yourself : Plantable Paper

You may use toilet paper, paper grocery bags, junk mail, tissue paper, napkins or paper towels, construction paper or phone book pages. Gather your seeds, your paper and check out the directions on eHow. Tricia Goss gives step by step directions on how to make plantable paper. What a wonderful activity for children.


Good News!


This is how we should all be looking at recyclable materials. How may we recycle, reuse, repurpose materials that are now considered "waste." Whether you craft it yourself or purchase it online, be on the lookout for this Plantable Paper, a totally green replacement for paper cards.


4 comments:

Lyndi said...

What a wonderful idea. I stay in a flat (apartment for my American friends) and I could actually plant these pamphlets etc. in a pot on the veranda. Now if only we could do something similar with those horrid plastic bags.

Pete said...

Where we live (in south Australia) plastic bags have now been banned, all people need to use enviro friendly options. may be wrong but I think we are one of the first states in the world to ban the use of these bags

John said...

This is a fantastic idea. It'd be great if they could use seeds for some of the wild-flowers which are in decline. I'd definitely buy the birthday cards.

ThatGrrl said...

That's really neat. When friends moved to a new place I usually give them a package of wildflower seeds. Even in an apartment you can stick them in a pot and see what comes up. They do seem to need to be outside though, never quite make it as indoor-only plants.

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