Monday, December 14, 2009

Say No to Radioactive Dump in Texas

Radioactive Waste Commission Punts [in Texas] | NukeFree.org

Last week, the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact Commission postponed decision making for 30 days. The contentious issue the import and export of radioactive waste to and from Texas to a waste dump near Andrews County, Texas.

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Excerpt from http://www.savetheogallalaaquifer.com/images/pdf/utig_earthquake.pdf

Chapter 12 of, State of Texas Hazards Analysis, by the Governor's Division of Emergency Management, Department of Public Safety, Austin, Texas, 1998.

Introduction: Earthquakes in Texas

For Texans, three essential facts about earthquakes are important to remember. First, earthquakes do occur in Texas (see Figure 12A). Within the twentieth century there have been more than 100 earthquakes large enough to be felt; their epicenters occur in 40 of Texas's 257 counties.

Second, in four regions within Texas there have been historical earthquakes which indicate potential earthquake hazard. Two regions, near El Paso and in the Panhandle, should expect earthquakes with magnitudes of about 5.5-6.0 to occur every 50-100 years, and even larger earthquakes are possible.

Third, while Texas does face some earthquake hazard, this hazard is very small in comparison to that in many other states . . . . For reasons of safety, economy, and (in some cases) law, Texans need to consider earthquake hazard when designing or siting various structures which are essential for providing medical or emergency management services, which house sensitive manufacturing processes, or which store hazardous wastes.

figure 12 a
Figure 12A Locations of earthquakes and earthquake sequences that have occurred in Texas, or that were felt by Texas residents. Numbers are the year of occurrence.

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NOTE: The Ogallala Aquifer sits underneath the radioactive waste dump in Andrews County, Texas. This puts the primary source of drinking and agricultural water for eight states at significant risk.

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Take Action: If you agree, please send an email to Kay Bailey Hutchinson at http://hutchison.senate.gov/contact.html. Feel free to use anything in this post (above) or my message to Senator Hutchinson (below).

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The Ogallala Aquifer sits underneath the radioactive waste dump in Andrews County, Texas. This puts the primary source of drinking and agricultural water for eight states at significant risk.

For reasons of safety and economy, Texans need to consider earthquake hazard when designing or siting various structures which store hazardous wastes.

Texas is not the dumping ground for nuclear waste that will remain active for 28,000 years.

Solar power, wind power, geothermal power, hybrid and electric cars, and aggressive energy efficiency are climate solutions that are safer, cheaper, faster, more secure, and less wasteful than nuclear power.

Please read the TCEQ Interoffice memo dated August 14, 2007:
http://www.savetheogallalaaquifer.com/images/pdf/letter_of_aug_14_2007.pdf

Please do not allow a nuclear waste dump in Texas.



5 comments:

tommy said...

if people infected it will be really dangerous.

Rocky said...

Yes it is really important to preserve our environment these days because we are already in trouble with limited resources, global warming, and natural disasters.

deepman said...

Yes I agree we must safe our planet now..

CyberCelt said...

@tommy-If the waste contaminates the groundwater and aquifer, we will be in trouble. The Ogallala Aquifer reaches from West Texas to South Dakota.

@rocky-Just when it seems it cannot get worse--it does! Thanks for stopping by.

@deepman-I am with you, bro.

Water tanks said...

the radioactive dump will not affect the present generation, but also, the future generation.this is hazardous....

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